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  • What women can learn from those who came before them

    American women have come far since the first women's rights convention in 1848. The first female conductor, speaker of the house, astronaut to walk in space, chess grandmaster and others explain what it was like to break the glass ceiling in their field, and what is next for America's women.

American women have come far since the first women's rights convention in 1848. The first female conductor, speaker of the house, astronaut to walk in space, chess grandmaster and others explain what it was like to break the glass ceiling in their field, and what is next for America's women. Natalie Fertig, Ali Rizvi, Patrick Gleason McClatchy
American women have come far since the first women's rights convention in 1848. The first female conductor, speaker of the house, astronaut to walk in space, chess grandmaster and others explain what it was like to break the glass ceiling in their field, and what is next for America's women. Natalie Fertig, Ali Rizvi, Patrick Gleason McClatchy

Donald Trump may have accidentally created a new women’s movement

January 17, 2017 6:00 AM