Seth Shteir, a field representative for the National Parks Conservation Association, looks over a natural spring at the Mojave National Preserve in California on Oct. 19, 2011. By tapping into an aquifer the size of Rhode Island, Cadiz, a private company, hopes to sell water to thirsty Southern California but has been unable to obtain final federal permits. “There’s a lot of unknowns here but we think this project has the potential to adversely affect air quality, draw down water resources and alter the flow of groundwater beneath the Mojave Preserve,” said Shteir.
Seth Shteir, a field representative for the National Parks Conservation Association, looks over a natural spring at the Mojave National Preserve in California on Oct. 19, 2011. By tapping into an aquifer the size of Rhode Island, Cadiz, a private company, hopes to sell water to thirsty Southern California but has been unable to obtain final federal permits. “There’s a lot of unknowns here but we think this project has the potential to adversely affect air quality, draw down water resources and alter the flow of groundwater beneath the Mojave Preserve,” said Shteir. Chris Carlson AP
Seth Shteir, a field representative for the National Parks Conservation Association, looks over a natural spring at the Mojave National Preserve in California on Oct. 19, 2011. By tapping into an aquifer the size of Rhode Island, Cadiz, a private company, hopes to sell water to thirsty Southern California but has been unable to obtain final federal permits. “There’s a lot of unknowns here but we think this project has the potential to adversely affect air quality, draw down water resources and alter the flow of groundwater beneath the Mojave Preserve,” said Shteir. Chris Carlson AP

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February 08, 2017 6:00 AM

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