Unurbileg, a Mongolian herder, holds one of her daughters, Bujinlkham, age 2, inside the family's yurt in grasslands near the Tuul River in central Mongolia, July 13, 2015. Her husband, Duuree, sleeps in the background after a long day of watching and herding the family's sheep, horses and other animals. Unurbileg -- who like many Mongolians only uses one name -- says her family is doing well, evidenced by the satellite dish and new Toyota SUV they have outside their yurt. But she worries about the future. A single cold winter could wipe out the family's wealth, their livestock.
Unurbileg, a Mongolian herder, holds one of her daughters, Bujinlkham, age 2, inside the family's yurt in grasslands near the Tuul River in central Mongolia, July 13, 2015. Her husband, Duuree, sleeps in the background after a long day of watching and herding the family's sheep, horses and other animals. Unurbileg -- who like many Mongolians only uses one name -- says her family is doing well, evidenced by the satellite dish and new Toyota SUV they have outside their yurt. But she worries about the future. A single cold winter could wipe out the family's wealth, their livestock. Stuart Leavenworth McClatchy
Unurbileg, a Mongolian herder, holds one of her daughters, Bujinlkham, age 2, inside the family's yurt in grasslands near the Tuul River in central Mongolia, July 13, 2015. Her husband, Duuree, sleeps in the background after a long day of watching and herding the family's sheep, horses and other animals. Unurbileg -- who like many Mongolians only uses one name -- says her family is doing well, evidenced by the satellite dish and new Toyota SUV they have outside their yurt. But she worries about the future. A single cold winter could wipe out the family's wealth, their livestock. Stuart Leavenworth McClatchy

World

July 27, 2015 1:18 PM

Landlocked Mongolia worries China’s becoming too close

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