Ulm attorney Manfred Gnjidic (Friday in Ulm, Germany) last saw his client Khalid al-Masri, he was broke, unkempt, paranoid and completely alone. He was in deep need of psychological counseling but with no hope of the extensive help he needed. “I was stunned by the torture report, that in it they had known and privately admitted for years that they had made a mistake regarding Khalid... For a decade, a decade in which his life has been shattered, he’d asked for that, an apology, an explanation, a chance to go ahead with his life. They knew this, they admitted this and they didn’t share this with him?"
Ulm attorney Manfred Gnjidic (Friday in Ulm, Germany) last saw his client Khalid al-Masri, he was broke, unkempt, paranoid and completely alone. He was in deep need of psychological counseling but with no hope of the extensive help he needed. “I was stunned by the torture report, that in it they had known and privately admitted for years that they had made a mistake regarding Khalid... For a decade, a decade in which his life has been shattered, he’d asked for that, an apology, an explanation, a chance to go ahead with his life. They knew this, they admitted this and they didn’t share this with him?"
Ulm attorney Manfred Gnjidic (Friday in Ulm, Germany) last saw his client Khalid al-Masri, he was broke, unkempt, paranoid and completely alone. He was in deep need of psychological counseling but with no hope of the extensive help he needed. “I was stunned by the torture report, that in it they had known and privately admitted for years that they had made a mistake regarding Khalid... For a decade, a decade in which his life has been shattered, he’d asked for that, an apology, an explanation, a chance to go ahead with his life. They knew this, they admitted this and they didn’t share this with him?"

World

December 13, 2014 3:17 PM

Yet no apology: CIA’s mistaken detention destroyed German man’s life

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