Thomas Drake, a former senior official at the NSA, seen at his home in Glenwood, Md. on Dec. 16, 2014, cooperated with a Pentagon inspector general inquiry in 2002 into allegations of waste and mismanagement of an NSA surveillance program known as Trailblazer. When The New York Times revealed the NSA's warrantless wiretapping and electronic surveillance programs in 2005, Drake was caught up in the FBI's investigation in to leaked information, despite having no ties to the Times' reporting. Drake's home, along with the homes of other former NSA workers involved in the 2002 inquiry, was raided by armed agents.
Thomas Drake, a former senior official at the NSA, seen at his home in Glenwood, Md. on Dec. 16, 2014, cooperated with a Pentagon inspector general inquiry in 2002 into allegations of waste and mismanagement of an NSA surveillance program known as Trailblazer. When The New York Times revealed the NSA's warrantless wiretapping and electronic surveillance programs in 2005, Drake was caught up in the FBI's investigation in to leaked information, despite having no ties to the Times' reporting. Drake's home, along with the homes of other former NSA workers involved in the 2002 inquiry, was raided by armed agents. McClatchy
Thomas Drake, a former senior official at the NSA, seen at his home in Glenwood, Md. on Dec. 16, 2014, cooperated with a Pentagon inspector general inquiry in 2002 into allegations of waste and mismanagement of an NSA surveillance program known as Trailblazer. When The New York Times revealed the NSA's warrantless wiretapping and electronic surveillance programs in 2005, Drake was caught up in the FBI's investigation in to leaked information, despite having no ties to the Times' reporting. Drake's home, along with the homes of other former NSA workers involved in the 2002 inquiry, was raided by armed agents. McClatchy

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