On the streets of Kabul, the two- and three-floor homes are the sort that many in Kabul refer to as Poppy Palaces because they are often owned by government officials or those connected with them who make low salaries but have expensive homes thought to be paid for with proceeds from Afghanistan's drug industry. (Tom Lasster/MCT)
On the streets of Kabul, the two- and three-floor homes are the sort that many in Kabul refer to as Poppy Palaces because they are often owned by government officials or those connected with them who make low salaries but have expensive homes thought to be paid for with proceeds from Afghanistan's drug industry. (Tom Lasster/MCT) Tom Lasseter / MCT
On the streets of Kabul, the two- and three-floor homes are the sort that many in Kabul refer to as Poppy Palaces because they are often owned by government officials or those connected with them who make low salaries but have expensive homes thought to be paid for with proceeds from Afghanistan's drug industry. (Tom Lasster/MCT) Tom Lasseter / MCT

National Security

May 10, 2009 12:00 AM

West looked the other way as Afghan drug trade exploded

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