Jim McNamara holds one of his old photos showing him in action as an honor guard (far left in photo) in the trial of Japanese Gen. Masaharu Homma, the “Beast of Bataan” (third from left, seated at table in white suit looking through pages of evidence that would ultimately send him before a firing squad). After six months of combat, Jim McNamara was 19 in the Philippines when he reassigned to stand guard at war crimes trials after WWII in Manila in late 1945 to October 1946. He would guard some of the most fearsome Japanese military leaders including the “Beast of Bataan” who commanded troops that committed atrocities on the famous 65-mile march on which 10,000 died.
Jim McNamara holds one of his old photos showing him in action as an honor guard (far left in photo) in the trial of Japanese Gen. Masaharu Homma, the “Beast of Bataan” (third from left, seated at table in white suit looking through pages of evidence that would ultimately send him before a firing squad). After six months of combat, Jim McNamara was 19 in the Philippines when he reassigned to stand guard at war crimes trials after WWII in Manila in late 1945 to October 1946. He would guard some of the most fearsome Japanese military leaders including the “Beast of Bataan” who commanded troops that committed atrocities on the famous 65-mile march on which 10,000 died. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com
Jim McNamara holds one of his old photos showing him in action as an honor guard (far left in photo) in the trial of Japanese Gen. Masaharu Homma, the “Beast of Bataan” (third from left, seated at table in white suit looking through pages of evidence that would ultimately send him before a firing squad). After six months of combat, Jim McNamara was 19 in the Philippines when he reassigned to stand guard at war crimes trials after WWII in Manila in late 1945 to October 1946. He would guard some of the most fearsome Japanese military leaders including the “Beast of Bataan” who commanded troops that committed atrocities on the famous 65-mile march on which 10,000 died. Diedra Laird dlaird@charlotteobserver.com

‘Tragic’ tales from Japan war-crimes trials still sting 70 years later

May 17, 2016 05:48 PM

UPDATED May 17, 2016 06:25 PM

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