Mel Sheldon, chairman of Tulalip tribes, speaks as he and other tribal leaders gather at a rally while visiting Washington for the White House Tribal Nations Conference to urge Congress to uphold treaty rights and reject permits for a shipping terminal in Lummi's fishing waters. The rally took place at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C., Nov. 5, 2015. As Lummi Nation fights to protect its fishing areas from North America's largest coal terminal, other tribes have faced their own development pressures and stand united with Lummi against the terminal and what they say is the erosion of treaty rights.
Mel Sheldon, chairman of Tulalip tribes, speaks as he and other tribal leaders gather at a rally while visiting Washington for the White House Tribal Nations Conference to urge Congress to uphold treaty rights and reject permits for a shipping terminal in Lummi's fishing waters. The rally took place at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C., Nov. 5, 2015. As Lummi Nation fights to protect its fishing areas from North America's largest coal terminal, other tribes have faced their own development pressures and stand united with Lummi against the terminal and what they say is the erosion of treaty rights. Ken Cedeno McClatchy
Mel Sheldon, chairman of Tulalip tribes, speaks as he and other tribal leaders gather at a rally while visiting Washington for the White House Tribal Nations Conference to urge Congress to uphold treaty rights and reject permits for a shipping terminal in Lummi's fishing waters. The rally took place at Freedom Plaza in Washington, D.C., Nov. 5, 2015. As Lummi Nation fights to protect its fishing areas from North America's largest coal terminal, other tribes have faced their own development pressures and stand united with Lummi against the terminal and what they say is the erosion of treaty rights. Ken Cedeno McClatchy

Northwest tribal leaders fight for government to uphold treaties

November 05, 2015 04:24 PM

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