Rev. Bruce Prescott, left, applauds during a vigil outside a Hobby Lobby store in Edmond, Okla., Monday, June 30, 2014, in reaction to the Supreme Court's decision that some companies like the Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby chain of arts-and-craft stores can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, if they have religious objections.
Rev. Bruce Prescott, left, applauds during a vigil outside a Hobby Lobby store in Edmond, Okla., Monday, June 30, 2014, in reaction to the Supreme Court's decision that some companies like the Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby chain of arts-and-craft stores can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, if they have religious objections. AP
Rev. Bruce Prescott, left, applauds during a vigil outside a Hobby Lobby store in Edmond, Okla., Monday, June 30, 2014, in reaction to the Supreme Court's decision that some companies like the Oklahoma-based Hobby Lobby chain of arts-and-craft stores can avoid the contraceptives requirement in President Barack Obama's health care overhaul, if they have religious objections. AP

Hobby Lobby ruling fuels political and legal uncertainty

July 02, 2014 9:55 AM