Until June, Islamic State extremists used this fenced-in fountain on a main traffic circle in Tal Abyad to behead those they labeled criminals or enemies of the state. Today, a banner outside the city’s municipal headquarters uses the city’s Kurdish name, Giri Spi, to declare it “the living symbol of coexistence between Kurds, Arabs, Armenians and Turkmans.”
Until June, Islamic State extremists used this fenced-in fountain on a main traffic circle in Tal Abyad to behead those they labeled criminals or enemies of the state. Today, a banner outside the city’s municipal headquarters uses the city’s Kurdish name, Giri Spi, to declare it “the living symbol of coexistence between Kurds, Arabs, Armenians and Turkmans.” Roy Gutman McClatchy
Until June, Islamic State extremists used this fenced-in fountain on a main traffic circle in Tal Abyad to behead those they labeled criminals or enemies of the state. Today, a banner outside the city’s municipal headquarters uses the city’s Kurdish name, Giri Spi, to declare it “the living symbol of coexistence between Kurds, Arabs, Armenians and Turkmans.” Roy Gutman McClatchy

Nation & World

November 01, 2015 1:45 PM

Kurds setting up to rule in Syrian town Islamic State held

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