Opinion

Commentary: Sen. Graham put integrity above partisanship

Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor is greeted by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on the first day of her confirmation hearings.
Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor is greeted by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) on the first day of her confirmation hearings. (Rafael Suanes / MCT)

"The political ‘golden rule’ is: Do unto others as they did unto you. The actual Golden Rule is: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."— U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham

When Senate Democrats cast a nearly unprecedented 42 votes against Samuel Alito’s confirmation to the Supreme Court to “send a message” to President Bush not to nominate the qualified judges he wanted, Republicans warned of retribution.

And on Thursday they exacted it, as all but nine Senate Republicans marched lemming-like in opposition to President Obama’s first high court nominee. That the nominee happened to be Sonia Sotomayor was irrelevant; anyone nominated would have been opposed.

This adherence to the political golden rule is the latest escalation of a destructive game that makes a mockery of the checks and balances the framers of the Constitution had in mind when they required Senate confirmation of judicial appointments — a process designed not to prevent presidents from nominating judges who look at the world in generally the way they do but to intervene in those rare cases when there is something truly wrong, disqualifying about a nominee.

That is why Sen. Graham would have no part of it.

To read the complete editorial, visit thestate.com.

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