White House

Obama awards medals of freedom to Washington state leaders

Billy Frank Jr., chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, poses for a photo, Friday, June 29, 2012, at Frank's Landing on the Nisqually River near Olympia, Wash. Frank, who died in 2014, was a tribal advocate argued that treaty rights with the U.S. are at risk because the region is losing habitat that salmon need to survive. Frank was honored posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Billy Frank Jr., chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, poses for a photo, Friday, June 29, 2012, at Frank's Landing on the Nisqually River near Olympia, Wash. Frank, who died in 2014, was a tribal advocate argued that treaty rights with the U.S. are at risk because the region is losing habitat that salmon need to survive. Frank was honored posthumously with the Presidential Medal of Freedom on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) AP

Nisqually tribal member Billy Frank Jr. was arrested for the first time at age 14 in western Washington state. In the following 30 years, he would be arrested at least 50 more times.

But it was his peaceful protests and resilience while advocating for Native American treaty rights and fishery protections that brought his legacy to the White House on Tuesday afternoon.

President Barack Obama awarded 17 Americans, including Frank, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor. The ceremony honored activists, composers, public servants, athletes, performers and scientists who have made significant contributions to national and security interests, world peace or cultural endeavors.

“This is an extraordinary group,” Obama said. “We are just reminded what an incredible tapestry this country is, what a great blessing to be in a nation where individuals immersed in wildly different backgrounds can help shape our dreams, how we live together, help define justice, freedom and love. They represent what’s best in us.”

Among those honored at the White House were professional baseball players Yogi Berra and Willie Mays, first African-American congresswoman Shirley Chisholm, musicians Gloria and Emilio Estefan, veterans health advocate Bonnie Carroll and renowned violinist Itzhak Perlman.

Also honored were lyricist Stephen Sondheim, film director Steven Spielberg, performer Barbra Streisand, recording artist James Taylor, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, policy expert Lee Hamilton, NASA mathematician Katherine G. Johnson and civil rights lawyer Minoru Yasui.

Obama recounted each of the recipients’ stories, highlighted their contributions to society, favorite quotes and quirky anecdotes before presenting each with their medal. He recalled how Frank used to say, “‘I wasn’t a policy guy, I was a getting-arrested guy.’”

He was spat on, shot at, chased, clubbed and cast as an outlaw, but Billy kept fighting because he knew he was right.

President Barack Obama, on Billy Frank Jr.

Frank died in May 2014. His niece attended in his honor.

“We are so grateful that President Obama is recognizing him,” his son Willie Frank III said. “It’s such a great honor for the family to see this award in my dad’s name.”

Frank worked tirelessly to protect salmon habitats and fishing rights for Native American communities in the Pacific Northwest, even when faced with violence and jail time.

“He saved the salmon that had fed his family for generations,” Obama said. “He was spat on, shot at, chased, clubbed and cast as an outlaw, but Billy kept fighting because he knew he was right.”

Frank’s activism, which included “fish-ins” to protest state laws restricting Indian fishing access and creating the political group Survival of the American Indian Association, was instrumental for the Boldt decision, a landmark court case that restored Native American rights to fishing grounds as specified in treaties more than 100 years old.

“He didn’t do it just for the tribe, he did it for everybody,” Frank III said. “Salmon is very important for our way of life, traditions and our culture, if it wasn’t for the warriors back in the 50s, 60s and 70s, I don’t know where the tribes in Washington would be today.”

In 1974, Frank founded the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission to unite the 20 treaty Indian tribes that Boldt established as natural resource co-managers with Washington state. He served as the chairman for 30 years until his death in May 2014. He was 83.

He didn’t do it just for the tribe, he did it for everybody.

Billy Frank III, son of tribal rights activist Billy Frank Jr.

Frank always considered the salmon essential to his family and tribe’s livelihood, culture and tradition, his son said, which fueled his fight for state and federal recognition of the treaties from the 1850s that protected tribal fishing practices in “usual and accustomed” locations, indifferent of a reservation designation.

“Billy went on to become a national voice for Indian country, a warrior for the natural war,” Obama said.

In his later years, Frank often worked with previous EPA Administrator William “Bill” Ruckelshaus, who also received the Presidential Freedom Award. Ruckelshaus founded and serves as the chairman of the Ruckelshaus Center, a joint effort by Washington state’s two research universities to assist public, private, tribal, non-profit and other community leaders in public policy issues in the Pacific Northwest. They both have worked extensively to restore and protect the Puget Sound along Washington’s coast.

“Under Bill’s leadership the EPA set a powerful precedent, protecting our environment is something we must come together to do as a country,” Obama said of Ruckelshaus.

Frank’s legacy was also celebrated in his home state, where Bellingham officially changed a street name to Billy Frank Jr. Street. Frank also has received the Martin Luther King, Jr. Distinguished Service Award for Humanitarian Achievement, and in May Congress introduced a bill that would rename the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge in Washington State as the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge.

“His message about protecting our treaty rights, sovereignty, natural resources that never changed,” Frank III said. “He saw the main picture, the big goal. …There’s never going to be anyone like my dad.”

Phone: 202-383-6025; Twitter: @grace_2e

Presidential Medal of Freedom honorees

Yogi Berra (posthumous), professional baseball player and coach

Bonnie Carroll, founder of the Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS)

Shirley Chisholm (posthumous), first African-American congresswoman

Gloria and Emilio Estefan, Miami Sound Machine musicians

Billy Frank Jr. (posthumous), Native American rights advocate

Lee Hamilton, international policy expert

Katherine G. Johnson, NASA mathematician

Willie Mays, professional baseball player

Sen. Barbara Mikulski, longest-serving female senator

Itzhak Perlman, renowned violinist and musician

William D. “Bill” Ruckelshaus, the first Environmental Protection Agency administrator

Stephen Sondheim, theater composer and lyricist

Steven Spielberg, film director and producer

Barbra Streisand, performer and singer

James Taylor, recording artist

Minoru Yasui (posthumous), civil rights lawyer who challenged the internment of Japanese Americans

Source: White House

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