White House

No wall on White House talking points on State of the Union

The border wall region, from the air

In November, a video team from Brookings Productions visited the U.S.-Mexico border region and captured these aerial images of where President Trump has proposed to build his border wall.
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In November, a video team from Brookings Productions visited the U.S.-Mexico border region and captured these aerial images of where President Trump has proposed to build his border wall.

The White House sent talking points to supporters Tuesday breaking down five themes for tonight’s State of the Union.

A wall wasn’t one of them.

According to the “messaging preview,” President Donald Trump will cast an “inspiring vision of American greatness” and outline a policy agenda that “both parties can rally behind to achieve this vision.

President Donald Trump on Tuesday night gave his second State of the Union address after it was rescheduled because of a historic 35 day government shutdown.

There was also no mention of declaring a national emergency declaration, as he hinted last week, to get the funds to build his border wall.

The five top issues include a safe and legal immigration system, protecting American workers by fixing broken trade deals, rebuilding American via infrastructure projects and protecting America’s national security.

“The president will update Congress on diplomatic efforts around the world and reaffirm his determination to protect American interests and end our endless foreign wars,” the document states.

While there is no mention of the wall in the preview, Trump did however save his first tweet Tuesday morning emphasizing the need for a barrier, possibly a human one.

“Tremendous numbers of people are coming up through Mexico in the hopes of flooding our Southern Border,” he tweeted. “We have sent additional military. We will build a Human Wall if necessary. If we had a real Wall, this would be a non-event!”

Trump told reporters on Jan. 4 that he could officially declare a national emergency to build a border wall but wants to try to negotiate a border wall with Congress.

Franco Ordoñez is a White House correspondent for the McClatchy Washington Bureau with a focus on immigration and foreign affairs. He previously covered Latin American affairs for the Miami Herald and El Nuevo Herald. He moved to Washington in 2011 after six years at the Charlotte Observer covering immigration and working on investigative projects for The Charlotte Observer.
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