White House

Trump seeks advice of business leaders who opposed him

President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Wisconsin State Fair Exposition Center, Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in West Allis, Wis.
President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a rally at the Wisconsin State Fair Exposition Center, Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016, in West Allis, Wis. AP

President-elect Donald Trump is seeking advice from business leaders – and some of those who opposed him have agreed to get on board.

Trump created the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, which initially had 16 members, to provide advice as he looks to implement his economic agenda.

On Wednesday, he announced a trio of additional members: Travis Kalanick, CEO and co-founder of Uber Technologies; Elon Musk, chairman and CEO of SpaceX and Tesla; and Indra Nooyi, chairman and CEO of PepsiCo.

None of them were Trump fans.

In October 2015, Kalanick said he’d leave the country if Trump won: “Oh my god, Donald Trump’s gonna win. I’m going to move to China if Donald Trump wins.”

In November, before the election, Musk told CNBC: “I think a bit strongly that (Trump) is probably not the right guy” for the presidency, and that “he doesn’t seem to have the sort of character that reflects well on the United States.”

A few days later, Nooyi criticized him for bragging about sexual assault in a 2005 video.

Other members of the forum include: Stephen A. Schwarzman, co-Founder of Blackstone; Paul Atkins, CEO of Patomak Global Partners; Mary Barra, chairman and CEO of General Motors; Toby Cosgrove, CEO of the Cleveland Clinic; Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co; Larry Fink, chairman and CEO of BlackRock; Bob Iger of chairman and CEO of the Walt Disney Company; Rich Lesser, president and CEO of Boston Consulting Group; Doug McMillon, president and CEO, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.; Jim McNerney, president and CEO of Boeing; Adebayo “Bayo” Ogunlesi, chairman and managing partner of Global Infrastructure Partners; Ginni Rometty, chairman, president and CEO of IBM; Kevin Warsh, former member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System; Mark Weinberger, global chairman and CEO of EY; Jack Welch, former chairman and CEO, General Electric; and Daniel Yergin, vice chairman of IHS Markit.

Musk attended Trump’s tech summit Wednesday.

“America has the most innovative and vibrant companies in the world, and the pioneering CEOs joining this forum today are at the top of their fields,” Trump said. “My administration is going to work together with the private sector to improve the business climate and make it attractive for firms to create new jobs across the United States from Silicon Valley to the heartland.”

  Comments