White House

It’s Groundhog Day: Another batch of Clinton emails is released

FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 file photo, former President Bill Clinton applauds as his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in New York, where she conceded her defeat to Republican Donald Trump after the hard-fought presidential election. Hillary Clinton's aides and supporters are urging dispirited Democrats to channel their frustrations about the election results into political causes - just not into efforts to recount ballots in three battleground states. The former Democratic presidential candidate and her close aides see the recount drive largely as a waste of resources, according to people close to Clinton.
FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 file photo, former President Bill Clinton applauds as his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in New York, where she conceded her defeat to Republican Donald Trump after the hard-fought presidential election. Hillary Clinton's aides and supporters are urging dispirited Democrats to channel their frustrations about the election results into political causes - just not into efforts to recount ballots in three battleground states. The former Democratic presidential candidate and her close aides see the recount drive largely as a waste of resources, according to people close to Clinton. AP

The emails are still coming.

The State Department released 1,000 pages of Hillary Clinton’s emails Thursday, the first release since the presidential election.

The emails were turned over by the FBI, which collected them during its investigation into the possible mishandling of classified information by Clinton and her aides. Many of those released include near duplicates to those already released.

The releases of emails Clinton sent or received as secretary of state continues in response to lawsuits filed against the State Department.

None of Clinton’s emails was marked as classified during her tenure, State Department officials say, but intelligence officials say some material was clearly classified at the time. Her aides also sent and received classified information.

That means the classified number remains what it was in February, when the department released what it considered the final batch of emails: At least 2,079 emails that Clinton sent or received contained classified material.

No charges were filed. President-elect Donald Trump said he would not seek to further investigate Clinton’s email use.

Periodic releases of emails and other documents are expected to continue through 2018. Conservative groups and news organizations had filed numerous lawsuits seeking the emails of Clinton and her top aides while she was the nation’s top diplomat after their public records requests went unanswered.

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