Elections

Clinton goes door to door in search of New Hampshire votes

Ella Hamel, 4, of Concord, N.H., cries as she and her sister Ava Hamel, 7, are greeted by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a campaign stop at Belmont Hall in Manchester Saturday.
Ella Hamel, 4, of Concord, N.H., cries as she and her sister Ava Hamel, 7, are greeted by Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton during a campaign stop at Belmont Hall in Manchester Saturday. AP

. Hillary Clinton engaged in old-fashioned door-to-door, person-to-person campaigning Saturday as she sought votes in snowy New Hampshire.

The former secretary of state is far behind Sen. Bernie Sanders, Ind.-Vt., in most polls, but is hoping to beat expectations and create momentum for upcoming contests in South Carolina and Nevada, where she’s seen as having a better shot.

Clinton started her Saturday at Belmont Hall and Restaurant in Manchester ("since 1932"), a cozy little restaurant packed with breakfast eaters. Biscuits and gravy costs $6.99, and there were old-fashioned signs all over the ways saying things like, "Coffee 5 cents."

Clinton moved through the narrow aisles, talking to Mike Houle. "Try the French toast," he advised. Clinton said that was a good idea.

Next, on to a long table where Steve Hamel was sitting with his daughters, Ava, 7, and Ella, 4. Ella started crying as Clinton stood behind her, smiling for pictures.

"Sometimes I’m sitting where you’re sitting and it gets pretty overwhelming," Clinton said.

Next it was on to a residential neighborhood. Clinton went to Beacon and High Streets, streets still somewhat icy after Friday’s snowstorm. But residents carved paths in their sidewalks. Clinton would go door to door on both streets for about 45 minutes.

Clinton was greeted by five college students at the corner with big "Hillary" signs. Sarah King, a Saint Anselm College student, explained "Clinton will make college more affordable." King called herself a "detail oriented person and when I saw her plan I was impressed."

Emily Rice, also part of the welcoming crew, also a Saint Anselm student, said, "She’s the first person to say women’s rights are human rights."

Among Clinton’s stop was 699 Beacon, where she spoke outside the house with Janet Poisson. They discussed the relationship of credit unions and banks. Poisson works for a credit union. Asked if she was voting for Clinton, Poisson said, "Most likely. This helps."

Then it was on to 686 Beacon, and a visit with Ann Masson-Texeira. "I was a supporter of your husband and I’m a supporter of you," she said. She then introduced Clinton to her 7-year-old Cairn terrier, Duncan. Clinton hugged the dog.

Masson-Texeira said it was "too bad you can’t come to the VFW." Clinton expressed regret. "I end up in Portsmouth tonight," she said. "Say hello to everybody down there."

"Can I hug you," Masson-Texeira asked. So they did.

David Lightman: 202-383-6101, @lightmandavid

  Comments