Elections

Club for Growth rips Donald Trump’s economic plans

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump talks with New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner before filing papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015, at The Secretary of State's office in Concord, N.H.
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump talks with New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner before filing papers to be on the nation's earliest presidential primary ballot, Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015, at The Secretary of State's office in Concord, N.H. AP

The conservative Club for Growth has released a “White Paper” on Donald Trump and it’s unsurprisingly not complimentary.

The group -- which has publicly tussled with the real estate magnate -- says its conclusion is that the contender for the Republican presidential nomination “would not be a pro-growth president.”

Club for Growth President David McIntosh said Trump held “anti-growth” positions on taxes, trade, entitlements and government regulations before 2015 “and still defends a massive government role in health care, a mostly hands-off approach to entitlement reform, and protectionist policies that would likely spark trade wars and lead to higher business and consumer costs.”

Club for Growth’s political action committee announced in August it would steer donations to Sens. Ted Cruz, Rand Paul and Marco Rubio, along with former Gov. Jeb Bush and Gov. Scott Walker, who has since dropped out of the race.

Trump on the campaign trail has accused the group of writing a bad mouthing him because he wouldn’t contribute $1 million. A spokesman at the time said it was Trump who had indicated an interest in donating to the group.

"But that doesn’t change the fact that the Club for Growth PAC thinks he’s an unserious candidate and would make a terrible president, just as we publicly pointed out during his last political publicity stunt in 2011," spokesman Doug Sachtleben said at the time.

In its review of Trump’s policies, the Club says, among other things, that Trump’s “hostility towards free trade is unmatched by any other major presidential candidate, with the possible exception of Bernie Sanders” who is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination.

It notes that Trump has frequently given to Democrats and “anti-growth Republicans who later left the party,” including former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist.

“While Trump has clearly touched a nerve with Americans who are frustrated with Washington, his approach to politics is not unlike the worst of Washington politicians,” the group says. “Instead of taking consistent and principled stands, he has jumped on popular bandwagons.”

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