Elections

Clinton barely outraises Sanders in previous three months

FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. With a presidential debate and a contentious appearance in Congress coming, Hillary Rodham Clinton faces an October of opportunity and risk for her troubled presidential campaign.
FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks in Des Moines, Iowa. With a presidential debate and a contentious appearance in Congress coming, Hillary Rodham Clinton faces an October of opportunity and risk for her troubled presidential campaign. AP

Hillary Clinton pulled in $28 million for her presidential campaign during the previous three months, barely outraising her chief rival, Bernie Sanders, who collected $25.5 million during the same time period.

Sanders’ haul is all the more impressive because he held far fewer fundraisers while Clinton attended a flurry of them during the third quarter.

Neither campaign indicated how much money they had in the bank as of Sept. 30, the final day of the fundraising quarter.

Sill, the Clinton campaign said it was pleased with the numbers, which came from a mix of online and grassroots donations and smaller fundraising events, with 93 percent of donations totaling $100 or less. It was the largest off-year third quarter for a non-incumbent, according to the campaign.

“We are thrilled and grateful for the support of hundreds of thousands of donors across the country, helping us raise a record $75 million in the first two quarters,” Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook said. “Thanks to our supporters, we are able to meet our goals and build an organization that can mobilize millions of voters to ensure Hillary Clinton is their fighter in the White House.”

Sanders of Vermont touted the number of his donations, saying he had surpassed a goal of 1 million. His campaign said it received about 1.3 million donations from 650,000 donors since the campaign began, milestones Barack Obama achieved months later.

Clinton raised three times as much money, a record $47 million, as him during the last quarter, a record amount of money during a primary in a candidate’s first quarter. Sanders raised $15.2 million in the same time period, including $1.5 million transferred from his Senate campaign.

She has been working to raise $100 million this year for the primaries, which is similar to what Obama raised in 2007 and 2011. Even if she clinches the Democratic nomination early, she can still only spend primary money until she’s formally nominated by the Democratic National Convention in July 2016.

Candidates have until October 15 to file forms with the Federal Elections Commission that will outline where the money came from and how it was spent.

Three others are running for the Democratic nomination – former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley, former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee and former Virginia Sen. Jim Webb.

In addition to the historic fundraising quarter for her own campaign, the Hillary Victory Fund raised at least $3 million to help build the party.

Lesley Clark contributed to this report.

CORRECTION: An earlier version gave the wrong number of donors to Sanders’ campaign.

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