Elections

GOP will control at least 243 House seats, most since 1940s

The House of Representatives and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
The House of Representatives and the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. McClatchy

Republicans have 243 House of Representatives seats. Democrats have 181, and 11 races remain undecided.

That’s the tally three days after the election, compiled by the House Press Gallery. Republicans have a decent chance of having their biggest majority in the House since the 1940s, and perhaps since the 1920s. Republicans won 246 seats in 1946.

Six of the 11 too-close-to-call districts are in California. The others: Two in Louisiana, one each in Arizona, New York and Washington.

Some other statistics:

Thirteen incumbents – 10 Democrats and three Republicans – lost.

The next Congress will have 57 new members, 40 Republicans and 17 Democrats.

Eighty-seven members are women: 65 Democrats and 22 Republicans.

Forty-six members are African-American, all but two are Democrats.

Thirteen are Asian-American, all but one Democrats. Two are listed as American Indians, both Republican.

Thirty-five are Hispanic. Twenty-six are Democrats, nine are Republicans.

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