Congress

Survivor’s hope becomes law: Cancer clusters will be tracked

Republican Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho, center, with Trevor Schaefer, right, and Schaefer’s mother, Charlie Smith, outside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, June 22, 2016.
Republican Sen. Mike Crapo of Idaho, center, with Trevor Schaefer, right, and Schaefer’s mother, Charlie Smith, outside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, June 22, 2016. Courtesy of office of Sen. Mike Crapo

President Barack Obama signed “Trevor’s Law” on Wednesday, legislation named after a Boise man that will require the federal government to document and track cancer clusters around the nation.

“This is the last step to make this law official,” said Trevor Schaefer, who survived a diagnosis of brain cancer in 2002 at age 13. “I am thrilled to finally get this to the finish line. “

This is the last step to make this law official. I am thrilled to finally get this to the finish line.

Trevor Schaefer

Schaefer and his mother, Charlie Smith, who’s also from Boise, attended the signing ceremony at the White House. They were accompanied by Idaho Republican Sen. Mike Crapo.

Trevor’s Law will require the government to document and track childhood and adult cancer clusters in Idaho and around the nation. In 2013, Schaefer joined cancer activist Erin Brockovich and others to testify for the legislation on Capitol Hill.

Crapo and California Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer helped get the provision included in a broader bill, the Toxic Substances Control Act, that passed the Senate earlier this month. The House passed the legislation in May.

“Today’s bill signing proves again the power of one Idahoan, one American, to bring change that will benefit millions of people who could face cancer one day,” Crapo said.

Rob Hotakainen: 202-383-0009, @HotakainenRob

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