Politics & Government

White House vows to keep searching for abducted Nigerian schoolgirls

Deborah Peter listens at left as House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 21, 2014, during a pre-hearing news conference. Peter, is a sole survivor of a Dec. 11, 2011, Boko Haram attack on her household in Nigeria, where her father and brother were killed for not renouncing their Christian faith.
Deborah Peter listens at left as House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Ed Royce, R-Calif. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 21, 2014, during a pre-hearing news conference. Peter, is a sole survivor of a Dec. 11, 2011, Boko Haram attack on her household in Nigeria, where her father and brother were killed for not renouncing their Christian faith. AP

It’s been six months since 270 Nigerian school girls were abducted by the terrorist group Boko Haram, six months in which the Ebola virus, the rise of the Islamic State, and racial unrest in Ferguson, Mo., have consumed America’s attention span.

The Obama administration marked the six-month anniversary of the mass abduction Tuesday with a statement saying it has not forgotten the girls and it will not halt U.S. assistance in searching for them.

‘The United States has made clear our commitment to supporting Nigeria’s efforts to bring the girls home safely,’ National Security Advisor Susan Rice said in the statement. ‘Since then, we have aided in the investigations, including by deploying personnel on the ground, facilitated strategic communications, and provided assistance to the families.’

‘We will continue to work toward the release of all the girls who remain in captivity, even as we celebrate the freedom of the few who have managed to escape Boko Haram’s clutches,’ Rice added. ‘And, we will stand with girls everywhere who seek to achieve their full potential through education and to claim the universal rights and fundamental freedoms that are their birthright.’

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