Politics & Government

Will Trump’s Tweets soon be twice as long?

President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
President Donald Trump speaks with reporters before boarding Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File) AP

Twitter announced on Tuesday that it would be giving select users twice as many characters to play with as they craft messages on the social media site.

Until now, Tweets had been limited to 140 characters in length. The change Twitter has announced would allow some users 280 characters instead — the first change in message length the company has made in its 11-year history.

But before rolling that change out broadly, Twitter wants to test it on a smaller group of people. What’s unclear, though, is exactly who will be in that group. That’s left many wondering: Will the Tweeter-in-chief soon have twice as many characters to work with on Twitter?

Twitter has 328 million users around the world, according to the Los Angeles Times, but perhaps none has used the platform more famously than President Donald Trump.

Twitter told Recode that the limited group of users testing the expanded character limit will be chosen at random — so it’s not yet clear whether or not Trump will make the cut.

“[We] won't know until it goes live,” a Twitter spokesperson told Recode.

Even before running for president, Trump used Twitter to communicate with supporters, go after adversaries and do everything in between. And while Trump hasn’t struggled to get his message across in 140 characters or less, speculation about how Trump would handle 280 character is already rampant on Twitter.

A July ABC News/Washington Post poll found that 67 percent of Americans disapprove of how the president uses Twitter. More than half of respondents said Trump’s Tweets are “inappropriate,” “insulting,” or “dangerous,” while only 36 percent said they were effective, and only 21 percent called them “refreshing.”

And with Trump, Twitter can be high stakes.

Just days ago, the president Tweeted a threat to North Korea — and North Korea indicated that it was treating the Tweet as a declaration of war, according to The Guardian.

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