Politics & Government

A Little Golden Book parody teaches kids ‘alternative facts’

Boing Boing’s Facebook page shared a Little Golden Book parody mocking Conway’s use of “alternative facts.”
Boing Boing’s Facebook page shared a Little Golden Book parody mocking Conway’s use of “alternative facts.” Facebook

If you’re of a certain age, Little Golden Books were a childhood staple for learning how to read, featuring the tales of characters like Scuffy the Tugboat and the Saggy Baggy Elephant.

But after President Donald Trump’s adviser Kellyanne Conway used the term “alternative facts” in reference to misinformation, internet user Tim O’Brien decided to project how young kids might learn about such “facts” through the iconic children’s book.

“The Little Golden Book of Alternate Facts,” Photoshopped to resemble many of the other covers in the series, features common household objects and animals, each labeled with an entirely different noun. A picture of a chair is labeled “table,” an egg is called “soup,” and in a nod to Trump’s Treasury nominee Steven Mnuchin, a carrot is labeled with his last name.

The outrage over “alternative facts” began Sunday, when Conway appeared on “Meet the Press” and defended press secretary Sean Spicer’s inaccurate statement about the size of inauguration crowds.

“Sean Spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts,” Conway said.

“Wait a minute,” host Chuck Todd countered. “Alternative facts? ... Four of the five facts he uttered were just not true. Alternative facts are not facts. They are falsehoods.”

The debate quickly sparked mockery on social media, and even had many users turning to the dictionary to check what a fact really is.

But the Little Golden Book parody was hardly the only meme to emerge from Conway’s exchange on “Meet The Press”:

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