Politics & Government

U.S. senator fires one-word comeback after Twitter user calls him a ‘house n----’

By Greg Hadley

ghadley@mcclatchy.com

‘When I die, I want to be reborn in Charleston,’ Biden tells Sen. Scott at swearing-in

Vice President Joe Biden loves the Palmetto State. When South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott was sworn in on Jan. 3, Biden told him, “When I die, I want to be reborn in Charleston.”
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Vice President Joe Biden loves the Palmetto State. When South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott was sworn in on Jan. 3, Biden told him, “When I die, I want to be reborn in Charleston.”

Tim Scott is the first black Republican U.S. senator from the South since Reconstruction and the only black Republican in the Senate at the moment. He also has announced he will vote for Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to become the next attorney general.

Given the allegations of racism that have followed Sessions since he was denied a federal judgeship in 1986, Scott’s decision to support him has been met with plenty of criticism.

And lots of that criticism has come online, especially on Twitter, where Scott has 162,000 followers. But one tweet in particular annoyed Scott. User @Simonalisa blasted Scott and former Sessions aide William Smith by referring to them using a racial slur.

“I have three or four pages of that kind of crap because of the Sessions nomination,” Scott told the Washington Post. “There were so many n-words and racially insensitive words coming at me over the Budget Control Act in 2011 that my employees were crying. Unfortunately, people feel like they have a license to say stupid stuff, and too often it comes from liberals.

“So I thought it was a good time to tell people what I thought.”

Scott’s response was simple.

And that response earned plenty of rave reviews online, earning more than 3,000 likes as of Wednesday night.

The tweet and the account that sent it have since been deleted.

But this is far from the first time Scott has faced racism while in office, according to his communications director, Sean Smith.

“Back in the House, we had to shut down our phones one day because so many people — not from South Carolina and not conservatives — were calling and saying things like "I'm never going to drive through your n----- state again,” Smith said in a written statement sent to The Post and Courier.

Scott has also spoken on the Senate floor about encountering systemic racism within the Capitol, being stopped repeatedly by police because of the color of his skin.

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