Politics & Government

Democrats want ‘someone entirely new’ in 2020, poll finds

Vice President Joe Biden, left, laughs with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a ceremony to unveil a portrait of Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, in Washington.
Vice President Joe Biden, left, laughs with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during a ceremony to unveil a portrait of Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016, in Washington. AP

President-elect Donald Trump has not yet been sworn into office and some are already casting their eyes toward the 2020 presidential election.

Perhaps inspired by Trump’s surprising victory as a first-time candidate for any political office, Democrats and independents are seeking “somone entirely new” for the 2020 race, according to a Suffolk University/USA Today poll released Wednesday.

[Poll: Obama’s biggest success and biggest failure are the same thing]

Two-thirds of Democrats and independents polled said they were excited by the possibility of “someone entirely new” running to challenge Trump. “New” generated more excitement (66.29 percent) than Sen. Bernie Sanders (43.61 percent), Vice President Joe Biden (43.45 percent), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (34.19 percent), 2016 presidential nominee Hillary Clinton (22.68 percent) and former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick (10.38 percent).

A majority of respondents (61.98 percent) thought Clinton, who lost the Democratic nomination to President Barack Obama in 2008 and the general election to Trump in November, should not run again in 2020.

Sanders, an independent from Vermont, lost the Democratic nomination to Clinton in 2016, but found a larger-than-expected base of support and incredible enthusiasm during his run. Biden, who opted not to run in the primary in 2016 after his son’s death, has not ruled out a 2020 campaign. Warren, a favorite of progressives and first-term senator from Massachusetts, was among those Clinton considered as her running mate.

More than half of those polled (52.72 percent) had never heard of Patrick, the only African-American on the list and a two-term governor.

Patrick, 60, is the youngest of those named. Warren is 67 years old, Clinton 69, Biden 74 and Sanders 75. Trump is 70 and the oldest person elected president. Ronald Reagan was older when he won re-election in 1984.

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