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Bernie Sanders scores two major endorsements

Where does Bernie Sanders stand?

Bernie Sanders entered the 2016 presidential race on May 26, 2015, running as a Democrat. Find out where he stands on four of the biggest issues this election: immigration, ISIS, job growth and gay marriage. (Video by Natalie Fertig / McClatchy DC
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Bernie Sanders entered the 2016 presidential race on May 26, 2015, running as a Democrat. Find out where he stands on four of the biggest issues this election: immigration, ISIS, job growth and gay marriage. (Video by Natalie Fertig / McClatchy DC

Days before the third Democratic debate, Bernie Sanders received a pair of major endorsements.

Sanders was endorsed Thursday by the Communications Workers of America, a union representing 700,000 workers. The announcement follows a series of labor union endorsements, representing nearly 12 million people, for front-runner Hillary Clinton.

“CWA members endorsed Bernie Sanders because he is the candidate who is talking about real solutions to make our economy fair again,” CWA President Chris Shelton said. “Politics as usual has gotten working people nowhere. It’s time for real change. That’s what CWA members are saying, loud and clear.”

Democracy for America, a progressive political action committee, endorsed even after founder former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean backed Clinton. Both groups work on fundraising and organizing. The union has a political action committee that can make unlimited independent expenditures in support of Sanders or against other candidates.

Sanders earned Democracy for America’s endorsement after receiving nearly 88 percent of 271,527 votes cast by members nationwide over a nine-day voting period.

To win an endorsement, a single candidate needed to secure at least 66.67 percent of votes cast. This is the first presidential primary endorsement in Democracy for America’s 11-year history.

“Throughout his campaign, Bernie has repeatedly said that the huge problems of income inequality, money in politics and structural racism that our country must confront are bigger than a single campaign – they need a political revolution,” said Charles Chamberlain, executive director of Democracy for America. “With today’s endorsement, DFA members are joining Bernie’s ‘political revolution’ and working to take it both to the White House and up-and-down the ballot, in races coast to coast.”

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