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Clock-building kid attends White House astronomy night

President Barack Obama, right, shares a laugh with Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, a high school senior from the Brooklyn borough of New York as Obama prepares to look at the moon at the second White House Astronomy Night on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. The event brings together students, teachers, astronomers, engineers, scientists, and space enthusiasts for an evening of stargazing.
President Barack Obama, right, shares a laugh with Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, a high school senior from the Brooklyn borough of New York as Obama prepares to look at the moon at the second White House Astronomy Night on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 19, 2015. The event brings together students, teachers, astronomers, engineers, scientists, and space enthusiasts for an evening of stargazing. AP

Ahmed Mohamed, the 14-year-old Texas student who was arrested for bringing a homemade clock to school, attended the second annual astronomy night at the White House.

President Barack Obama did not single him out, though the two met at the event, which brings together students, teachers, scientists and astronauts to spend an evening stargazing.

Other attendees: Sen. Bill Nelson, D-FL, Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage from MythBusters, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden and Bill Nye, who was mobbed by students wanting selfies.

Flanked by a NASA space suit and a large reflective telescope, Obama spoke for about 10 minutes about opportunities for students in STEM to a crowd of about 300 seated on the South Lawn. "We need to inspire more young people to ask about the stars," he said.

Following his remarks, Obama was joined on stage by Agatha Sofia Alvarez-Bareiro, a high school senior from Brooklyn, who showed Obama the moon through an 11-inch telescope.

Guests had the opportunity to look through telescopes at the moon and the stars. The telescope Obama used was brought to the event from the National Air and Space Museum, where it is used for public events and educational outreach.

Obama had previously declared his support for Mohamed on Twitter, saying "Cool clock, Ahmed. Want to bring it to the White House? We should inspire more kids like you to like science. It's what makes America great."

More than 80 national parks, observatories, schools, museums, and astronomy clubs across the country also hosted local events tied to White House event.

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