National

California's dry resevoirs need rain

Experts agree the three-year drought must end in the next 12 weeks if California's depleted reservoirs are to recover in 2010 — and it might just happen, if the 10-day forecast is any indication. But will the rain and snow fall in the right place to replenish the state's largest reservoirs?

Meteorologists say they expect a series of Pacific storms to pound California, starting Sunday.

But will the rain and snow fall in the right place to replenish the state's largest reservoirs?

El Nino, the weather-influencing trend in the Pacific Ocean, often brings more snow to the Southern Sierra than the northern part of the range. But the state’s largest reservoirs — Shasta and Oroville — are in the north.

The two reservoirs need 110% of average runoff this year if they are to provide the normal supply of water for millions of Southern Californians, millions of San Joaquin Valley farmland acres and a faltering ecosystem in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

Read the complete story at fresnobee.com

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