Fog blankets the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. Some scientists want to pursue research into whether marine clouds could be seeded with salt water or other particles, to counter impacts of climate change. Known as “marine cloud brightening,” this technique aims to increase the ability of clouds to reflect solar energy away from the Earth’s surface, reducing temperatures caused by global warming.
Fog blankets the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. Some scientists want to pursue research into whether marine clouds could be seeded with salt water or other particles, to counter impacts of climate change. Known as “marine cloud brightening,” this technique aims to increase the ability of clouds to reflect solar energy away from the Earth’s surface, reducing temperatures caused by global warming. Eric Risberg AP
Fog blankets the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco on Friday, Oct. 21, 2016. Some scientists want to pursue research into whether marine clouds could be seeded with salt water or other particles, to counter impacts of climate change. Known as “marine cloud brightening,” this technique aims to increase the ability of clouds to reflect solar energy away from the Earth’s surface, reducing temperatures caused by global warming. Eric Risberg AP

We can brighten clouds to reflect heat and reduce global warming. But should we?

November 08, 2017 05:36 PM