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What’s in the JFK assassination files that will be released today?

Secret JFK assassination-related files to be released

Thousands of "secret" files surrounding the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy 54 years ago will finally see the light of day Thursday. The National Archives and Records Administration will make the files available on its website.
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Thousands of "secret" files surrounding the assassination of former President John F. Kennedy 54 years ago will finally see the light of day Thursday. The National Archives and Records Administration will make the files available on its website.

Nearly 54 years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, many Americans remain skeptical about how much the government knows about his murder.

But today we may get some more answers, as the National Archives is set to release 3,100 records about the 1963 assassination sometime today.

[How to see the ‘secret’ JFK assassination files]

Gallup polling has consistently found that a majority of Americans believe more than one person was involved in killing Kennedy.

In 2013, Gallup found that 61 percent of Americans say that Kennedy was killed as a part of a conspiracy, contradicting the Warren Commission's official findings that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in killing the president, according to The Washington Post.

That disconnect between public opinion and the official government stance is what excites many about the release of these documents, which President George H.W. Bush authorized to be released under the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992, according to USA Today.

Even President Trump, who could have stalled the documents’ release under the 1992 law, has been eagerly teasing the unsealing of the classified information.

So here’s what we can expect to find in the documents, which will be posted on the National Archives website.

Along with the 3,100 unreleased documents — which take up hundreds of thousands of pages — there are another 30,000 partially-released ones that could possibly be updated with more information, according to The Washington Post.

USA Today reported that the secret documents are likely to hold information about Oswald’s time in Mexico City only two months before killing Kennedy. During that six-day trip, Oswald met with Cubans and Soviets, The Post reported.

Experts predict that seeing how the CIA and FBI handled the high-profile event will be the most interesting portion of the documents, the Associated Press reported. It’s not likely that the tax returns of Jack Ruby, who shot Oswald two days after he killed Kennedy, will reach the public eye though, according to the Associated Press.

Minnesota Judge John Tunheim also told the AP that the documents will include information about an agreement between the United States and Mexico that enabled the U.S. to watch the Cuban and Soviet embassies Oswald visited while in the country.

There could also be information about the 1963 coup of South Vietnam leader Ngô Đình Diệm that was backed by the United States, according to CNN.

[What will we learn about Oswald’s Raleigh call and all of the Miami names?]

But overall, you shouldn’t get too excited, author Gerald Posner told CNN.

“Anybody who thinks this is going to turn the case on its head and suddenly show that there were three or four shooters at Dealey Plaza — it's not the case,” he said. "Oswald did it alone.”

“But what the files are doing and why they're important to come out is they fill in the history of the case and show us how the FBI and CIA repeatedly hid the evidence."

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