National

Gov. Rick Scott lifts last Zika zone in Miami Beach

Florida Gov. Rick Scott and State Surgeon General Dr. Celeste Philip announced on Aug. 19 that mosquitoes were spreading Zika in a 1.5-square-mile area of South Beach after five people had contracted the virus. Scott and Philip held the press conference inside the Miami-Dade Department of Health. On Friday, Scott is scheduled to lift the Zika zone over South Beach.
Florida Gov. Rick Scott and State Surgeon General Dr. Celeste Philip announced on Aug. 19 that mosquitoes were spreading Zika in a 1.5-square-mile area of South Beach after five people had contracted the virus. Scott and Philip held the press conference inside the Miami-Dade Department of Health. On Friday, Scott is scheduled to lift the Zika zone over South Beach. emichot@miamiherald.com

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has lifted the final zone of active Zika transmission in Miami-Dade, eliminating the last hot spot where mosquitoes were transmitting the virus.

The governor held a press conference at the Betsy Hotel in South Beach at 10 a.m. Friday to make the announcement. The lifting of the zone comes nearly four months after health officials first reported that mosquitoes were spreading the virus in a 1.5-square-mile area between Eighth and 28th Streets from the ocean to the bay.

QUOTE

In a hotel on Ocean Drive, Scott was joined by local tourism boosters who have eagerly awaited this day.

The elimination of the zone of active transmission removes the warning to pregnant women to avoid travel from the area. A broader warning remains in place for the whole county advising pregnant women and those who may become pregnant to consider postponing non-essential travel to all parts of Miami-Dade.

Officials have already acknowledged that Zika could return in 2017, partly due to the amount of travel of between Miami and places where the virus continues to spread, such as Brazil and Puerto Rico. Friday’s announcement also coincided with cooler temperatures as South Florida enters the winters season and exits mosquito season. When wetter weather returns and the mosquito population grows, there could be new cases.

  Comments