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Chair of Senate Intelligence: We will not share intelligence with Cuba

Eloy Angulo, 79, a former Cuban political prisoner, protests outside the Cafe Versailles in Little Havana on July 27, 2016.
Eloy Angulo, 79, a former Cuban political prisoner, protests outside the Cafe Versailles in Little Havana on July 27, 2016. mocner@miamiherald.com

The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee said it’s dangerous for the United States to considering sharing intelligence with a country that is so closely tied with Russia and Iran.

Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C, criticized a White House directive that instructs the U.S. director of national intelligence to cooperate with Cuban intelligence counterparts. Burr said the United States would alert any country of a possible imminent terrorist threat, but he said the United States should not be providing intelligence to any country that might share it with adversaries.

“I don’t think as long as I’m chairman of the committee, that the intelligence community is going to be in an intelligence sharing relationship with Cuba,” Burr said.

The little-known directive has raised concerns among South Florida Cuban Americans who are intimately aware of the Castro’s government past success spying on the United States government. But others feel that the United States could and should share a limited amount of information with the Cuban government much like it shares some terrorism related information with adversaries like Russia.

The Obama administration says the directive is intended to combat “mutual threats.”

Read more at InCubaToday.

Franco Ordoñez: 202-383-6155, @francoordonez

Anna Douglas: 202-383-6012, @ADouglasNews

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