Tom Sullivan, center, embraces family members hours after losing his son Alex in the mass killings of a dozen Aurora, Colo., movie goers and the wounding of 70 others on July 20, 2012. Sullivan later told The Associated Press that, “someone else’s son having a mental problem, having easy access to weapons, all of a sudden became my problem.’’
Tom Sullivan, center, embraces family members hours after losing his son Alex in the mass killings of a dozen Aurora, Colo., movie goers and the wounding of 70 others on July 20, 2012. Sullivan later told The Associated Press that, “someone else’s son having a mental problem, having easy access to weapons, all of a sudden became my problem.’’ Barry Gutierrez AP
Tom Sullivan, center, embraces family members hours after losing his son Alex in the mass killings of a dozen Aurora, Colo., movie goers and the wounding of 70 others on July 20, 2012. Sullivan later told The Associated Press that, “someone else’s son having a mental problem, having easy access to weapons, all of a sudden became my problem.’’ Barry Gutierrez AP

As mass killings rise, how can sheriffs keep guns from mentally unstable?

January 22, 2016 05:15 PM