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A look at winners, losers in the president's proposed budget

Some agencies would win big under President Bush's fiscal 2008 budget proposal, while others would suffer slashed funds. Here are some notable winners and losers:

WINNERS:

_Defense Department: $624.6 billion, a 4.1 percent increase over 2007. The Army would get $130.1 billion, a 20.4 percent increase. Some $37.6 billion would go to fix or replace equipment destroyed in battle.

_Veteran Affairs: $84.4 billion, a 13.3 percent increase over 2007. The VA will treat nearly 263,000 Iraq and Afghanistan war vets; the budget seeks $36.6 billion for medical care, including $3 billion for mental health.

_State Department: $37.4 billion, a 12.9 percent increase over 2007. Seeks to triple funding for the Millennium Challenge Corp., to $3 billion. The corporation provides aid to 11 fledgling democracies that meet U.S.-set fiscal criteria.

_Interior Department: $10.1 billion, a 4.1 percent increase over 2007. Seeks $1.9 billion for national parks, a 13 percent increase, including 40 percent more for daily park operations than when Bush took office. Seeks a $100 million match from citizens' contributions.

_Labor Department: $50.4 billion, a 7.9 percent increase over 2007. Seeks $313 million for the Mine Safety and Health Administration, a 13 percent increase from 2007 request.

LOSERS:

_Amtrak: Seeks $800 million, $500 million less than fiscal 2007.

_Environmental Protection Agency: $7.1 billion, a 4.9 percent cut from fiscal 2007.

_Low Income Home Energy Assistance: Seeks $1.8 billion, down from $3.2 billion, a 56 percent cut.

_Corporation for Public Broadcasting: Seeks $350 million, down from $460 million in fiscal 2007.

_Education Department: Seeks $62.6 billion, a 5 percent cut from fiscal 2007. Would eliminate more than three dozen programs.

_Labor Department's Bureau of International Labor Affairs: Would cut from $73 million to $14 million, nearly 81 percent.

_Office of Disability Employment Policy: Would cut from $28 million to $19 million, or 32 percent.

_Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Would cut by $550 million.

_By William Douglas

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(c) 2007, McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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