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EDITORS: To help localize MED-ORGANDONORS (Greve), 2004 state-level success rates for organ donations in Knight Ridder cities are below. Also named are any hospitals in KR cities that won Medals of Honor for Organ Donation in 2004 from the Department of Health and Human Services. The awards, won by 184 hospitals nationwide, recognize those that obtained donations from 75 percent or more of potential organ donors. HHS's Organ Donation Breakthrough Collaborative is the source of the figures.

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The Philadelphia-based Gift of Life Donor Program, which covers eastern Pennsylvania, south New Jersey and Delaware, obtained organ donations from 65 percent of potential donors last year. Pittsburgh's Center for Organ Recovery and Education, which handles western Pennsylvania, recovered 55 percent. The New Jersey Organ and Tissue Sharing Network, which covers northern New Jersey, recovered 49 percent.

Among area hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were: Abington Memorial in Abington; Lehigh Valley Hospital in Allentown; Altoona Hospital in Altoona; St. Luke's Hospital in Bethlehem; Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester; Geisinger Medical Center in Danville; Allegheny University Hospital—Center City in Philadelphia; Frankford Hospital in Philadelphia; Reading Hospital Medical Center in Reading; Community Medical Center in Scranton; and Main Line Hospitals Inc.-Lankenau in Wynnewood. Also: Atlantic City Hospital in Atlantic City, N.J., and Shore Memorial Hospital in Somers Point, N.J.

In Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson Hospital scored the greatest improvement, from 33 percent to 67 percent monthly from January 2004 to March 2005. Albert Einstein Medical Center increased from 45 to 58 percent.

Among Michigan hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were: Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Mount Clemens General Hospital in Mount Clemens and St. Joseph Mercy Hospital and University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor.

In North Carolina, the Greenville-based Carolina Organ Procurement Agency, which covers the eastern half of the state, obtained organ donations from 63 percent of potential donors last year. Charlotte-based LifeShare of the Carolinas, which covers the western half plus York County, S.C., recovered just 42 percent. In the Charlotte area, Presbyterian Hospital improved most, from 20 percent to 58 percent monthly from January 2004 to March 2005. Northeast Medical Center in Concord increased from 33 percent to 56 percent.

In South Carolina, Charleston-based LifePoint, which covers virtually all of the state, obtained organ donations from 57 percent of eligible donors last year. LifeShare of the Carolinas, which covers York County, recovered just 42 percent. Grand Strand Regional Medical Center in Myrtle Beach was among 184 hospitals nationwide that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004.

In Ohio, Cleveland-based Lifebanc, which covers the northeastern part of the state, including Akron, obtained organ donations from 54 percent of potential donors last year. Two of the state's three other organ-procurement organizations were within a percentage point of that rate. The fourth, Cincinnati-based LifeCenter Organ Donor Network, obtained just 47 percent. It covers southwestern Ohio and northern Kentucky.

In Kentucky, Louisville-based Organ Donor Affiliates, which covers virtually all of the state, obtained organ donations from 52 percent of potential donors last year. Cincinnati-based LifeCenter Organ Donor Network, which includes Kenton, Boone, Campbell, Gallatin, Grant, Kenton and Pendleton counties, obtained 47 percent.

In Georgia, Norcross-based LifeLink of Georgia, which covers the entire state, obtained organ donations from 54 percent of potential donors last year.

In Florida, Miami's Life Alliance Organ Recovery Agency, which covers the southeast coast, obtained donations from just 43 percent of potential donors last year. Only the states of Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee and Alabama had lower rates. Translife, which covers Orlando and east-central Florida, had a 61 percent rate. Gainesville-based LifeQuest Organ Recovery Services, which covers Tallahassee and the Panhandle, won consent from 56 percent of potential donors. Tampa-based LifeLink of Florida, which covers the state's west coast, won 54 percent of potential donors. Among Florida hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were the North Broward Medical Center in Pompano Beach and Shands Hospital at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

In Minnesota, St. Paul-based LifeSource, which covers virtually all of the state and the Dakotas, obtained donations from 63 percent of potential donors last year.

Among area hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were St. Mary's Hospital in Rochester and St. Mary's Medical Center in Duluth. In North Dakota, Meritcare Hospital in Fargo won recognition. In Sioux Falls, S.D., two hospitals did: Sioux Valley Hospital and Avera McKennan Hospital and University Health Center.

In Mississippi, the Jackson-based Mississippi Organ Recovery Agency, which covers all but about 20 northern border counties, won consent from just 34 percent of potential organ donors last year. That's the lowest rate of any U.S. organ-procurement group. The Memphis-based Mid-South Transplant Foundation, which covers the rest of Mississippi, won consent from 42 percent of potential organ donors. Among 184 hospitals nationwide that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 was the Singing River Hospital System in Pascagoula.

In Kansas and Missouri, Westwood-based Midwest Transplant Services, which includes all of Kansas and western Missouri, obtained donations from 63 percent of potential organ donors last year. MidAmerica Transplant Services, which represents St. Louis, eastern Missouri and southern Illinois, recovered 67 percent. The biggest improvement in the Kansas City area was at the University of Kansas Hospital, where the donation rate increased from 57 percent to 80 percent monthly from January 2004 to March 2005.

Among area hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were: St. Luke's Hospital of Kansas City; Research Medical Center in Kansas City; University of Kansas Hospital in Kansas City; Olathe Medical Center in Olathe; Stormont Vail Healthcare in Topeka; and Via Christi Regional Medical Center and Wesley Medical Center in Wichita.

Three St. Louis area hospitals also won recognition: St. Anthony's Medical Center, St. John's Mercy Medical Center and St. Louis Children's Hospital.

In California, the Oakland-based California Transplant Donor Network, which covers most of northern California and two border counties in northwestern Nevada, Washtoe and Carson, obtained donations from 68 percent of potential organ donors last year. Sacramento-based Golden State Donor Services, which covers northern interior mountain counties, won consent from just 49 percent. San Diego's Lifesharing Community Organ Donation tied for the nation's highest rate with the University of Wisconsin Hospital's organ-procurement organization, at 78 percent. Los Angeles-based One Legacy scored 53 percent.

The greatest improvement in the San Jose area was at San Jose Medical Center, where the donation rate increased from 63 percent to 100 percent monthly in the period from January 2004 to March 2005.

Among California hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were: Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Mission Hills; Doctors Medical Center and Memorial Hospital Medical Center in Modesto; Alameda County Medical Center and Children's Hospital Medical Center in Oakland; Kaiser Foundation Hospital in Redwood City; Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital in Salinas; Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center in San Luis Obispo; Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital in Santa Rosa; and Stanford Hospital.

In Indiana, the Indianapolis-based Indiana Organ Procurement Organization, which covers Fort Wayne and Gary, recovered organs from 59 percent of eligible donors last year. Among Indiana hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 was Methodist Hospitals Northlake, in Gary.

When it comes to organ donations, Texas is a county-by-county crazy quilt covered by three organ-procurement groups. The Houston-based LifeGift Organ Donation Center, which covers Fort Worth, recovered organs from 65 percent of eligible donors last year. The Dallas-based Southwest Transplant Alliance, which also covers Corpus Christi, Galveston, El Paso and Midland Odessa, also recovered 65 percent. The San Antonio-based Texas Organ Sharing Alliance, which includes Austin and McAllen, recovered 47 percent.

Among area hospitals that the Department of Health and Human Services gave gold medals for obtaining donations from 75 percent or more of potential donors in 2004 were: Arlington Memorial Hospital in Arlington; Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas; JPS Health Network in Fort Worth; and Harris Methodist Fort Worth Hospital.

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(c) 2005, Knight Ridder/Tribune Information Services.

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