Opinion

January 17, 2011 1:16 PM

Commentary: King worked for economic justice too

One of the most remarkable people I got to know as a young reporter in the 1980s was Myles Horton, whom Rosa Parks called “the first white man I ever trusted.” Horton helped start the Highlander Center in Tennessee, which became a cradle of the civil rights movement. He was a confidant of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.. In focusing on King’s work for racial justice, Horton said, many people ignore the fact that he was equally passionate about economic justice.

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