Knife River Construction's Carlos Sanchez works on some of the finishing touches to the construction site atop the Bird Rd. overpass Thursday afternoon off of Hwy 132 just west of the I-5 interchange. Dubbed the "overpass to nowhere" state officials proclaim that the project is fully funded by the gravel quarry companies to provide safer truck travel to and from the job site.
Knife River Construction's Carlos Sanchez works on some of the finishing touches to the construction site atop the Bird Rd. overpass Thursday afternoon off of Hwy 132 just west of the I-5 interchange. Dubbed the "overpass to nowhere" state officials proclaim that the project is fully funded by the gravel quarry companies to provide safer truck travel to and from the job site. The Modesto Bee
Knife River Construction's Carlos Sanchez works on some of the finishing touches to the construction site atop the Bird Rd. overpass Thursday afternoon off of Hwy 132 just west of the I-5 interchange. Dubbed the "overpass to nowhere" state officials proclaim that the project is fully funded by the gravel quarry companies to provide safer truck travel to and from the job site. The Modesto Bee

Bee Investigator: Upcoming Bird Road-Highway 132 overpass to nowhere actually does make sense

December 23, 2013 03:07 PM

UPDATED December 23, 2013 03:09 PM

More Videos

  • A health inspector's fate: Contamination

    Byron Vaigneur's job as a health supervisor at the Savannah River nuclear weapons plant in South Carolina was to protect workers from the harmful effects of radiation.  But he could not protect himself – he was exposed to plutonium while sitting at his desk in 1975 and developed cancer as a result.