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  • Gov. Haley: Thrilled Trump won but there's work for Republicans to do

    While speaking at the Federalist Society’s annual National Lawyers Convention, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley admitted that she wasn't always the biggest cheerleader of President-elect Donald Trump but that she voted for him and was thrilled he won. She also told other Republicans that his win was not an affirmation of how the GOP conducts itself and urged others to "go back to basics."

While speaking at the Federalist Society’s annual National Lawyers Convention, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley admitted that she wasn't always the biggest cheerleader of President-elect Donald Trump but that she voted for him and was thrilled he won. She also told other Republicans that his win was not an affirmation of how the GOP conducts itself and urged others to "go back to basics." C-SPAN
While speaking at the Federalist Society’s annual National Lawyers Convention, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley admitted that she wasn't always the biggest cheerleader of President-elect Donald Trump but that she voted for him and was thrilled he won. She also told other Republicans that his win was not an affirmation of how the GOP conducts itself and urged others to "go back to basics." C-SPAN

Nikki Haley will be Trump’s mouthpiece to the world. Can she speak the language?

November 23, 2016 05:12 PM

UPDATED November 23, 2016 07:34 PM

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  • Trump: US to declare North Korea is state sponsor of terror

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