An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan) Don Ryan AP
An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan) Don Ryan AP

Hillary Clinton opposes Obama’s OK of Arctic Ocean drilling

August 18, 2015 12:09 PM

UPDATED August 19, 2015 06:27 AM

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