Republicans enter the Hilton Coliseum before casting their ballots in the Iowa Republican Party's Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Aug. 13, 2011. Iowa’s presidential straw poll wants to go back to basics _ just politics, no need for tents filled with barbecue and flashy bands. Held since 1979, the Republican straw poll is considered an early test of strength in presidential campaigns. It’s grown from a county fundraiser to a major event where candidates spend heavily to bus in and entertain supporters. In 2011, for example, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee jammed with a classic rock band in a tent hosted by candidate Rick Santorum.
Republicans enter the Hilton Coliseum before casting their ballots in the Iowa Republican Party's Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Aug. 13, 2011. Iowa’s presidential straw poll wants to go back to basics _ just politics, no need for tents filled with barbecue and flashy bands. Held since 1979, the Republican straw poll is considered an early test of strength in presidential campaigns. It’s grown from a county fundraiser to a major event where candidates spend heavily to bus in and entertain supporters. In 2011, for example, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee jammed with a classic rock band in a tent hosted by candidate Rick Santorum. AP
Republicans enter the Hilton Coliseum before casting their ballots in the Iowa Republican Party's Straw Poll in Ames, Iowa, Aug. 13, 2011. Iowa’s presidential straw poll wants to go back to basics _ just politics, no need for tents filled with barbecue and flashy bands. Held since 1979, the Republican straw poll is considered an early test of strength in presidential campaigns. It’s grown from a county fundraiser to a major event where candidates spend heavily to bus in and entertain supporters. In 2011, for example, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee jammed with a classic rock band in a tent hosted by candidate Rick Santorum. AP

5 reasons the Iowa Straw Poll does not matter

May 22, 2015 06:00 AM

UPDATED May 21, 2015 05:42 PM

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