FILE - In this photo combination, the Confederate battle flag is raised in front of the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C., on July 1, 2000, left, and the same flag is taken down on July 10, 2015, right, ending its presence on the Capitol grounds. The flag’s removal seemed unthinkable before the June 17 massacre of nine black parishioners at a Charleston church during a Bible study. Dylann Roof, a white man who was photographed with the Confederate flag, is charged in the shooting deaths, and authorities have called the killings a hate crime.
FILE - In this photo combination, the Confederate battle flag is raised in front of the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C., on July 1, 2000, left, and the same flag is taken down on July 10, 2015, right, ending its presence on the Capitol grounds. The flag’s removal seemed unthinkable before the June 17 massacre of nine black parishioners at a Charleston church during a Bible study. Dylann Roof, a white man who was photographed with the Confederate flag, is charged in the shooting deaths, and authorities have called the killings a hate crime. Paula Illingworth, John Bazemore AP
FILE - In this photo combination, the Confederate battle flag is raised in front of the South Carolina Statehouse in Columbia, S.C., on July 1, 2000, left, and the same flag is taken down on July 10, 2015, right, ending its presence on the Capitol grounds. The flag’s removal seemed unthinkable before the June 17 massacre of nine black parishioners at a Charleston church during a Bible study. Dylann Roof, a white man who was photographed with the Confederate flag, is charged in the shooting deaths, and authorities have called the killings a hate crime. Paula Illingworth, John Bazemore AP

What really happened in flag debate in Congress

July 10, 2015 05:53 PM

UPDATED July 12, 2015 03:06 PM

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