Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy. ASSOCIATED PRESS
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy. ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reid, McConnell clash anew

July 10, 2014 12:59 PM

UPDATED July 10, 2014 01:02 PM

More Videos

  • Virginia's newly-elected openly transgender state representative: Discrimination is a disqualifier

    Virginia Democrat Danica Roem, the US’s first openly transgender state representative, gave a thank-you speech following the announcement of her win on Tuesday, November 7. She beat Bob Marshall, who had served in Virginia’s House of Delegates since 1992. Marshall introduced a “bathroom bill” earlier in the year, requiring people to use only the restroom that matched their biological sex. The bill was not passed. This video shows Roem’s victory speech at the election night watch party. “To every person who’s ever been singled out, who’s ever been stigmatized, who’s ever been the misfit… This one’s for you,” Roem said to a crowd of cheering supporters.