Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy. ASSOCIATED PRESS
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pauses as he faces reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, after bipartisan Senate opposition blocked swift confirmation for President Barack Obama's choice to head the Justice Department's Civil Rights division. The vote against advancing Debo Adegbile toward confirmation was 47-52, short of the majority needed under new procedures Democrats put in place earlier this year to overcome Republican stalling tactics. In this case, all 44 voting Republicans and eight Democrats lined up to block confirmation, leaving the nomination is grave jeopardy. ASSOCIATED PRESS

White House blasts Senate for blocking controversial nominee

March 05, 2014 02:10 PM

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