Sami Alkarim stands next to his artwork at the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art. Alkarim, a former Iraqi political prisoner, is among a growing number of refugees who have been barred from getting permanent residency in the United States because of a broad interpretation of post-Sept. 11 laws. Alkarim, who was tortured almost every day for three years in a prison run by Saddam Hussein, can't get his green card because of work he did as a teen-ager for the same political party that counts the current prime minister of Iraq as a member. (MCT)
Sami Alkarim stands next to his artwork at the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art. Alkarim, a former Iraqi political prisoner, is among a growing number of refugees who have been barred from getting permanent residency in the United States because of a broad interpretation of post-Sept. 11 laws. Alkarim, who was tortured almost every day for three years in a prison run by Saddam Hussein, can't get his green card because of work he did as a teen-ager for the same political party that counts the current prime minister of Iraq as a member. (MCT) MCT
Sami Alkarim stands next to his artwork at the Fort Collins Museum of Contemporary Art. Alkarim, a former Iraqi political prisoner, is among a growing number of refugees who have been barred from getting permanent residency in the United States because of a broad interpretation of post-Sept. 11 laws. Alkarim, who was tortured almost every day for three years in a prison run by Saddam Hussein, can't get his green card because of work he did as a teen-ager for the same political party that counts the current prime minister of Iraq as a member. (MCT) MCT

Politics & Government

July 26, 2009 6:00 AM

Why are U.S.-allied refugees still branded as 'terrorists?'

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