Politics & Government

October 22, 2008 2:43 PM

Terrorism: For Obama and McCain, split begins with Iraq

When it comes to fighting terrorism, John McCain and Barack Obama share some common ground. Both promise to intensify cooperation with other nations, boost U.S. intelligence-gathering and bolster homeland defenses. There also are profound differences in their approaches, however, beginning with Iraq.

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