Jim Bergquist, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, holds a keyboard to control the world's most accurate clock. It's based on the "ticks'' produced by a single atom of mercury contained at near-absolute zero temperature in the silver cylinder.
Jim Bergquist, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, holds a keyboard to control the world's most accurate clock. It's based on the "ticks'' produced by a single atom of mercury contained at near-absolute zero temperature in the silver cylinder. Geoffrey Wheeler / NIST / MCT
Jim Bergquist, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado, holds a keyboard to control the world's most accurate clock. It's based on the "ticks'' produced by a single atom of mercury contained at near-absolute zero temperature in the silver cylinder. Geoffrey Wheeler / NIST / MCT

Politics & Government

April 15, 2008 2:47 PM

Florida moving closer to Canada? Tiny measurements yield big discoveries

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