Numerous visitors to the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall, northeast of Beijing, have scrawled their names on the ancient walls and guard towers. Authorities are trying a new approach to prevent such damage by setting up "free graffiti" zones where tourists can write their messages in pen on plastic screens, instead of etching them into brickwork that is 600 years old or more. Friday, March 7, 2014.
Numerous visitors to the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall, northeast of Beijing, have scrawled their names on the ancient walls and guard towers. Authorities are trying a new approach to prevent such damage by setting up "free graffiti" zones where tourists can write their messages in pen on plastic screens, instead of etching them into brickwork that is 600 years old or more. Friday, March 7, 2014. McClatchy
Numerous visitors to the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall, northeast of Beijing, have scrawled their names on the ancient walls and guard towers. Authorities are trying a new approach to prevent such damage by setting up "free graffiti" zones where tourists can write their messages in pen on plastic screens, instead of etching them into brickwork that is 600 years old or more. Friday, March 7, 2014. McClatchy

China hopes to solve Great Wall graffiti problem with plastic screens

March 08, 2014 11:17 PM