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March 5, 2013 6:45 PM

Mexican families struggle to bring attention to those who’ve disappeared

Rogelio Elizondo’s son went to buy a used car in Nuevo Laredo two years ago. He never came back. In much of Mexico, Elizondo’s tragedy would remain the anguish of a solitary family in a country where the problem of ‘disappeared’ people is worse than anyplace else in the Western Hemisphere. But a slightly more positive story is unfolding. Elizondo joined with scores of other families looking into the cases of 298 missing persons in his state of Coahuila. The families raised a clamor. They met with the governor, who agreed to set up a special prosecutor’s office for the disappeared. And the fears of relatives melted somewhat as their ranks grew.

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