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  • No man’s land: Barbuda after Irma

    The Caribbean island of Barbuda felt the full force of Hurricane Irma. Now, a struggle to control its future is underway. On one side are Barbudans who own the land and want to preserve their unique way of life — on the other, the government and foreign investors who see opportunity in disaster.

No man’s land: Barbuda after Irma

The Caribbean island of Barbuda felt the full force of Hurricane Irma. Now, a struggle to control its future is underway. On one side are Barbudans who own the land and want to preserve their unique way of life — on the other, the government and foreign investors who see opportunity in disaster.
New York Times