An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan) Don Ryan AP
An activist looks towards the rising sun as she hangs from the St. Johns bridge as part of a protest to block the Royal Dutch Shell PLC icebreaker Fennica from leaving for Alaska in Portland, Ore., Thursday, July 30, 2015. The icebreaker, which is a vital part of Shell's exploration and spill-response plan off Alaska's northwest coast, stopped short of the hanging blockade, turned around and sailed back to a dock at the Port of Portland. On Monday, Aug. 17, 2015, the Interior Department said it would let Shell drill deep enough off Alaska’s northwest coast to find oil. (AP Photo/Don Ryan) Don Ryan AP

Climate warrior Obama gives OK for Arctic Ocean drilling

August 17, 2015 05:12 PM

More Videos

  • Arab lawmakers at Israel's Knesset tossed out after heckling Pence during speech

    Arab lawmakers in Israel's parliament were tossed out from the house on Monday for heckling U.S. Vice President Mike Pence at the start of his speech. The main Arab party in the parliament said it would boycott Pence's speech - though it wasn't immediately clear whether they would walk out in protest, heckle or skip the session altogether. The Knesset, which is accustomed to such high-profile visits, had added a new layer of security, and besides the speaker and other dignitaries, lawmakers did not have direct access to Pence. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called the boycott a disgrace. He and others gave Pence a standing ovation.